Build Muscle Fast with Primalog

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If you struggle to put on mass and want to learn how to build muscle fast, this is the article for you!

 

Chances are pretty good you’ve spent the past couple of months trying to build muscle and strength and an even greater amount of time, reading anything and everything you can get your hands on to figure out how to build muscle fast. While you’ve made decent progress over the past few months, you haven’t had made the physique-altering type of gains that you thought you would.

 

In search for better results and faster muscle growth, you’ve tried changing your training program, “confusing” your muscles with different exercises each week, buying all kinds of different muscle builder supplements, and watching countless hours of fitness videos for so-called “authorities” on YouTube on how to build muscle faster.

 

Needless to say, all this searching has left you completely and utterly confused, frustrated, irritated, and overwhelmed by the truckloads of contradictory tips, tricks, and advice from “fitness” websites, social media, and YouTubers.

 

Well, we’re here to sort through all of the nonsense and deliver everything you need to build muscle fast -- training, nutrition, hormone manipulation, and insider advice to finally make the gains you’ve always wanted, but never gotten.

 

So, let’s go to it!

 

carb timing, nutrient timing, post (split 3 before, 4 after) utilization....talk more about insulin

 

How To Build Muscle Fast

 

There are some ground rules that must be stated before we get into how to increase the rate of your muscle gains.

Calorie Surplus

 

If you want to build muscle fast, you must be in a caloric surplus. It is not possible to put on size in a calorie deficit. This surplus of calories is true regardless of whatever nutritional philosophy you follow, be it paleo, vegan, carnivore diet, intermittent fasting, or keto. You can’t cheat the laws of energy balance and thermodynamics. It’s that simple.

 

The good news, is that you don’t need a ridiculous surplus to build muscle quickly, only around a 10-20% surplus is all you need to build muscle fast while limiting fat gain.

 

We’ll come back to nutrition for muscle gain in a bit after we finish off the rest of the “ground rules” for how to build muscle fast.

 

Progressive Overload

 

The next foundational component of building muscle fast pertains to your training program. No matter what rep scheme, training split, or lifting tempo you follow, none of those will make the least bit of difference if you aren’t adhering to the principles of progressive overload.

 

Progressive overload simply means forcing your muscles to perform more work than they previously have. This can be in form of more reps, more sets, increased frequency, decreased rest between sets, etc. There’s several ways to increase the stress your muscles are subjected to with each subsequent workout, and if you want to build muscle fast, employing the principles of progressive overload is a must.

 

You see, your muscles are lazy. They like the size they are, and have no reason to grow in size or strength unless they’re forced to, and you “force” them to grow by making them work harder and harder each training session.

 

But, remember, all of this progressive overload is moot if you aren’t eating a surplus of calories. Muscle gain is ultimately dictated by getting your diet right.

 

Rest & Recovery

 

In this era of “no days off”, it can be tempting to want to train heavy every single day at the gym, but, if you want to build muscle fast, this is not at all how you want to structure your training. Building muscle quickly involves allowing your muscles enough time to recover. Remember, it’s not in the gym that muscles are built; it’s when you’re resting that they grow. Weight training is actually breaking your muscles down, providing the necessary stimulus they need to grow.

 

Proper rest and recovery starts with getting a solid 7-9 hours of sleep each night, as this is when hormone production is maximized and the greatest amount of growth and repair takes place in your body.

 

Secondly, and equally as important, is recovery.

 

Recovery is what takes place between the end of one training session and the beginning of the next one. It can take the form of stretching, foam rolling, yoga, walking, hiking, or “taking it easy” as in the case of an “off” day.

 

Rest and recovery are essential to training, failure to give your body the amount of recovery it needs not only affects how fast you can build muscle, but whether you build any muscle at all!

 

Limit Stress

 

There are multiple types of stress that you encounter every day. Weight training is an example of a “good” stress that provides the stimulus your muscles need to be challenged, adapt, and grow bigger in response too. “Bad” stress is the kind that keeps you up tossing and turning in the night, or things that have you constantly worrying. Examples of “bad” stress are bills, work deadlines, relationship complications, etc.

 

In small doses, stress can be useful for helping you get something accomplished (i.e. cramming before a midterm), but chronic stress is the enemy of muscle growth. Put another way, if you want to build muscle fast, you need to limit excessive stress in your daily life.

 

When you’re stressed, your body increases production of cortisol, an incredibly catabolic hormone that stunts muscle growth and encourages fat gain -- the exact opposite of what you want to occur when trying to build muscle fast.

 

Now, if you do these four things consistently day in, and day out. This will produce consistent gains, but not necessarily quickly. Let’s take a look at how to accelerate the process and and see what you can do to build muscle fast.

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Nutrition to Build Muscle Fast

 

Earlier we mentioned that in order to build muscle, you must be in a caloric surplus.

 

How much?

 

Well, if this was 10 or 20 years ago, you’d probably told to follow the GOMAD (gallon of milk a day) diet or embrace the “dirty” bulk where you eat 10,000+ calories per day all for the sake of building muscle as fast as humanly possible, but there’s a problem with the dirty bulking ways of yesteryear’s bodybuilders. Aside from muscle gain, it also came with a lot of unwanted fat gain.

 

You see, building muscle doesn’t require some ridiculous excess of calories. The “more is better, so A LOT more is WAY better” philosophy of gym bros doesn’t hold true for muscle growth, whether it be diet or training.

 

You do need a calorie surplus, but not a monstrous one.

 

In fact, the surplus you need is probably a lot smaller than you think -- only 10-20% above maintenance. For some of you out there with really fast metabolisms (i.e. hardgainers), a 10-20% surplus may not have you gaining any weight, which means you may need to take a 25-30% surplus, but these cases are few and far between.

 

If you don’t know your maintenance calories, check out this article to figure out how to calculate it.

 

So, what happens if you do have a larger surplus?

 

Well, you’re going to gain a lot more fat than muscle, regardless of your training split, rep scheme, or lifting tempo. And, when you start to accumulate more and more fat, your insulin sensitivity declines.[1] The worse your insulin sensitivity becomes, the harder it is for you to burn fat and build muscle fast.[2,3] Maintaining healthy insulin sensitivity is vital to optimal body composition and absolutely essential if you want to build muscle fast.

 

Ideally, you want to avoid binging, even after a workout when cheat meals are generally considered “ok”. Typically you want to gain no more than one pound per week, as this limits fat gain and maximizes muscle gain. Alas, if you do have an epic workout and make it rain PRs, then you might feel that you’ve earned the right to tackle a whole pizza or hit up the all-you-can eat sushi buffet. If you know you’re going to be getting down and dirty with carbs, it’s vital to use a glucose disposal agent so as to avoid spillover, limit fat gain, and ensure all those carbs go towards glycogen replenishment and muscle repair and growth.

 

Since we’re on the topic of post workout meals, now is the prime time to discuss one of the keys to building muscle fast -- nutrient timing.

 

“But, Nutrient Timing Isn’t Necessary!”

 

Right off the bat, there will be those out there who will say that the whole conversation surrounding nutrient timing is moot, pointing to recent research indicating meal timing is for the most part irrelevant.[4] What those detractors fail to realize is that stating that meal timing is “irrelevant” is a gross oversimplification of the research.

 

Yes, for the average lifter, hitting your total macronutrient and calorie goals is far more important at the end of the day, than whether or not you slammed a protein shake immediately after your workout. If you are the average lifter, and content to keep making mediocre gains, then that’s all well and good. But, this article isn’t for the “average” lifter. This article is for those who want to build muscle fast, and when you are trying to optimize everything related to muscle growth, nutrient timing can play a significant role in how quickly you build muscle and strength.

 

So, with that out of the way, let’s take a look at some of the research to glean some tips on how to optimize peri-workout nutrition for faster muscle gains and better recovery.

 

Nutrient Timing To Build Muscle Fast

Consume Protein Every Few Hours

 

Consistency is key to fast muscle growth, regardless if it’s diet, training, sleep, or recovery. We emphasize “consistently” because the reason most people fail to build muscle is that they’re not consistent with their nutrition or training.

 

Consistency starts with hitting your macro goals everyday, and since we’re trying to increase how fast we build muscle, we need to get consistent with protein intake. No doubt you know that a high protein diet is superior for muscle growth, but you probably didn’t realize how important consistent intake of protein is. By “consistent”, we don’t just mean your day-to-day protein intake (though that is important), what we mean is by how consistently you’re consuming protein during the day.

 

If you want to build muscle fast, you need to be eating adequate protein (about 1g per pound of bodyweight per day), but you also need to ingest protein every couple of hours. While science has shown that meal frequency doesn’t really impact weight loss[5], it can play a significant role in muscle growth.[6]

 

Research conducted at the Nestle Research Center placed resistance-trained men into one of three groups. Each group consumed a total of 80g of protein, but it’s how they consumed their protein that was interesting.

 

  • Group 1 consumed 10g of whey protein every 1.5 hours for a total of 8 “pulses”

  • Group 2 consumed 20g of whey protein every 3 hours for a total 4 feedings

  • Group 3 consumed 40g of whey protein twice, six hours apart

 

The first protein feeding for all groups was consumed after performing four sets of knee extensions (10 reps, 80% of 1RM), and the rest of the feedings followed the schedule we just outlined. Researchers documented that the group of men consuming protein every 3 hours produced the most favorable net protein balance, which is a key factor in muscle growth, as you must be in a net protein balance (protein synthesis > protein breakdown) in order to build muscle.

 

Again, total protein intake at the end of the day is the important takeaway, but if you want to build muscle fast, you can benefit from consuming at least 20 grams of protein every few hours.

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Consume Essential Amino Acids Pre Training

 

Common muscle-building advice states that you should focus on post exercise nutrition, so as to capitalize on the “anabolic window”, but some research indicates that it might be more beneficial, especially if you want to build muscle fast, to prioritize pre workout nutrition a bit more. Studies note that even a relatively small dose of essential amino acids (about 6g) consumed immediately pre workout elevates blood and muscle amino acid levels by approximately 130%[16]. Those elevated amino acid levels stayed that way for 2 hours after training too!

 

This research suggests that consuming a proper pre workout meal or taking an EAA supplement, such as EAA Max, immediately before exercise can sustain delivery of those crucial muscle-building aminos into the post exercise timeframe.

 

Consume Protein + Carbs After Training

 

Following training, your muscles are low in glycogen and primed to absorb whatever carbs you throw their way. This supercompensation of glycogen stores lasts only a short while, and if you wait too long (even as little as 2 hours), your rate of glycogen resynthesis can be reduced by as much as 50%![14] Intense training enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake following a workout, and the more quickly you get carbohydrates into your body, the faster glycogen is replenished and muscle repair can begin. Quicker recovery also allows you to train more frequently, which ultimately helps you build muscle faster.

 

Now, you’re probably wondering about the oft-recommended post workout protein shake. The good news is, is that you can still have your protein too, along with your carbs, as research notes combining the two macronutrients elevates insulin levels to a greater extent than carbohydrate alone[15], which is a very good thing for accelerating muscle growth, as we’ll explain next.

 

Optimizing Insulin for Better Muscle Growth

 

Testosterone, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) often get top billing when discussing muscle growth, but there’s another important that may just be more important that all three of those combined -- insulin. Make no mistake testosterone on the rest of its merry band of anabolic hormones is important, but insulin might just be the “king” of anabolic hormones.

 

How is that possible?

 

Well, insulin is responsible for muscle growth and glycogen storage. It is the hormone that shuttles glucose from the bloodstream and into your muscle tissue, and along with that glucose comes all of the essential amino acids (EAAs) you need to build muscle fast. Moreover, in addition to insulin’s anabolic properties, it also exerts significant anti-catabolic benefits as well, particularly in the time immediately following training.[11,12,13] That means that not only does insulin help build muscle fast, it also helps prevent muscle loss too, which is why we want to take advantage of insulin with proper carb and nutrient timing.

 

Now, insulin can work for muscle growth, but it can work equally well for storing fat, especially if you’re consuming too many calories and/or carbohydrates. Once your glycogen stores are filled and there’s no immediate need for energy, all of those carbs you’re crushing will go to fat stores, and it’s insulin putting them there.

 

So, how do we put insulin to work for building muscle and not storing fat?

 

Well, there’s a few things you can do to increase insulin sensitivity.

 

How to Improve Insulin Sensitivity

 

First, and most importantly, is reducing body fat. The more fat you accumulate, the worse your insulin sensitivity gets. Losing excess body fat is surefire way to ramp up insulin sensitivity.

 

Second, you want to get adequate sleep. Research notes that sleep deprivation leads to insulin resistance and fat gain, two enemies of fast muscle growth.[7] So, if you think that sleep is only for old people and babies, think again. It plays a key role in balancing your hormone levels, maintaining optimal insulin sensitivity, and support faster muscle growth.

 

The third key to maximizing insulin sensitivity is performing resistance-training and high intensity interval training. Not only are these forms of exercise superior for muscle growth and fat loss, they also improve glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity.[8,9,10]

 

Finally, you can also use supplements that enhance glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity. These supplements are typically called nutrient partitioners or glucose disposal agents (GDAs), and they’re usually used in conjunction with high-carb “cheat meals” to limit fat storage and encourage glycogen storage and muscle repair and growth.

 

What ingredients are typically found in glucose disposal agents?

 

There are several supplements that have been identified to enhance glucose disposal, insulin sensitivity, and GLUT4, including berberine, banaba, and cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G). Rather than have to source each of these ingredients on your own, which involves a lot of time and expense, we’ve created a comprehensive glucose disposal agent / nutrient partitioning supplement in Primalog.

 

Used at the right time, Primalog can do wonders to help you build muscle fast and reduce unwanted fat gain.

 

How to Dose Primalog to Build Muscle Fast

 

Primalog is incredibly versatile and can be used with either your pre workout or post workout meal. It can also be used with your highest carb-containing meal on your off days, to promote glycogen replenishment and recovery.

 

“Standard” dosing for Primalog is to consume one serving 15-20 minutes prior to your highest carb meal of the day, but the way we like to dose it, and the way you can use it to help build muscle fast, is to use the following dosing protocol:

 

Training Days: 3 capsules with your pre workout meal + 4 capsules with your post workout meal

 

Off Days / Cheat Meals: One full serving (7 capsules) with your largest carbohydrate meal of the day.

 

Build Muscle Fast Workout Routine

 

Up until now, the primary focus of this guide has been on the nutrition side of muscle growth. That still takes top billing, but now it’s time to address the other side of the equation for building muscle -- the training program.

 

Now, studies have shown that both high reps and low reps can be used to build muscle, and just about any training split will work (upper/lower, push/pull/legs, bro split, etc.). The most important thing is to work your muscles to fatigue and use progressive overload. This ensures you’ll gain muscle, but it doesn’t guarantee you’ll build muscle fast.

 

Remember, our goal is to maximize muscle growth, and minimize the amount of time it takes to build that muscle. In this case, it can be helpful to optimize training volume and frequency. Fortunately, more and more research regarding hypertrophy is being conducted by the likes of Brad Schoenfeld, Eric Helms, and Andy Galpin, as well as many others. These bodybuilding PhDs have identified what may be the “ideal” training method to build muscle fast.

 

So, what’s the best training split to build muscle fast?

 

Well, if we’re going by the research…

 

A systematic review by Brad Schoenfeld & company noted that higher volume protocols (>9 sets / muscle group per week) lead to greater gains in hypertrophy than low (

 

The “sweet spot” for total training volume seems to be in the 10-15 sets per muscle group, but the upper limit on the number of sets is ultimately determined by your ability to recover. If you’re not used to training with a large number of sets, start at 9-10 total working sets per muscle group per week, and assess your progress and recovery.

 

After volume, we need to address frequency, meaning how often should we train a muscle in order to build muscle fast. Is one time per week best like the traditional bro splits, or are the high-frequency protocols popular of today’s pro bodybuilders superior?

 

Fortunately, that’s been researched too! Studies using resistance-trained individuals noted that more frequent training (3x vs 1x per week) with volume equated[18], was superior, but there was no added benefit of very high frequency (6x vs 3x per week).[20,21]

 

Another review of the literature by Schoenfeld & friends indicated that training a muscle group 2x / week resulted in better muscle growth than training it 1x / week, but didn’t address training 3x / week:

 

“It can therefore be inferred that the major muscle groups should be trained at least twice a week to maximize muscle growth; whether training a muscle group three times per week is superior to a twice-per-week protocol remains to be determined.”[19]

 

So, what’s the take home message of these findings?



  • 10 working sets per week per muscle group appears to be the minimum number of sets needed to experience significant hypertrophic adaptations

  • Training more frequently is better than less frequently, but how often you train a muscle group is second to intensity and volume. If you’re not performing adequate volume or pushing your muscles to failure, how often you train your muscles really doesn’t matter.

  • Total weekly volume and one’s ability to recover from it is paramount to developing an effective hypertrophy training program and should be tailored to an individual’s abilities

  • Rest periods of 2-3 minutes may lead to better muscle growth than shorter rest periods (45-60 seconds).[20]

 

With all of these points in mind, here’s a program you can use to build muscle fast and experience gains in size and strength.

 

Training to Build Muscle Fast

 

Since hypertrophy is our focus here, we’re going to limit the amount of cardio that you’re doing to do and focus primarily on resistance-training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) both of which support muscle growth and insulin sensitivity. They also help burn fat too!

 

Keeping in mind the training takeaways we just discussed, we’ll be using an upper / lower split employing predominantly compound exercises using free weights as this allows us to provide the most overload for the muscle and generate the largest increases in muscle building hormones like testosterone and growth hormone.

 

You’re weekly training schedule will consist of:

 

  • Monday -- Lower A

  • Tuesday -- Upper A

  • Wednesday -- Active Recovery

  • Thursday -- Lower B

  • Friday -- Upper B

  • Saturday -- HIIT

  • Sunday -- OFF



Monday - Lower Body A

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Barbell Back Squat

3

6-12

120 sec

     

Romanian Deadlifts

3

6-12

120 sec

     

Standing Calf Raises

3

10-15

60 sec

     

Leg Extensions

3

10-12

60 sec

     

Leg Curls

3

10-12

0 sec

     

Hanging Leg Raise

3

Max Reps

60 sec

     

 

Tuesday - Upper Body A

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Barbell Row

3

6-12

120 sec

     

Bench Press

3

6-12

120 sec

     

Seated Dumbbell Overhead press

3

8-10

90 sec

     

Lat pulldown

2

10-12

60 sec

     

Pec Dec

2

10-12

60 sec

     

Cable Lateral Raise

2

10-15

60 sec

     

Rope Pushdowns

3

8-12

60 sec

     

Rope Hammer Curls

3

8-12

60 sec

     

 

Thursday - Lower Body B

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Front Squat

3

8-12

120 sec

     

Dumbbell Romanian Deadlifts

3

8-12

120 sec

     

Leg Press Calf Raises

3

10-15

60 sec

     

Hack Squat

2

10-15

60 sec

     

Reverse Lunge

2

10 / leg

60 sec

     

Seated Calf Raises

3

15-20

60 sec

     

Plank

3

Max Time

60 sec

     

 

Friday - Upper Body B

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Weighted Pull Ups

3

8-10

120 sec

     

Incline Dumbbell Press

3

6-12

120 sec

     

Military press

3

8-12

90 sec

     

Seated Cable Row

2

10-12

60 sec

     

Cable Crossover

2

10-12

60 sec

     

Face Pull

3

10-15

60 sec

     

Dips

3

8-12

60 sec

     

Incline Dumbbell Curls

3

8-12

60 sec

     

Supplement Plan to Build Muscle Fast

 

Nutrition, training, and recovery will be what determines your success with building muscle. Without those three things, you can forget about supplements altogether. Supplements are there to accelerate and enhance your performance, recovery, and growth. Provided you’ve got those three things taken care of, here’s a few supplements you absolutely want to have in your arsenal when trying to build muscle fast:

 

Primalog

 

We discussed the importance of insulin and carb timing up above, but we’re going to address it again. Primalog is the ultimate carb utilization / glucose disposal agent on the market, bar none. Using Primalog before and after training helps put the carbs you consume to maximum effectiveness, supporting optimal energy production, performance, recovery, and growth, all while limiting fat gain.

 

EAA Max

 

No time is more critical to supplement with essential amino acids (EAAs) than pre workout. Yes, it’s even more important than your post workout whey protein shake. Research shows that amino acid levels are elevated (and stay elevated) significantly greater when EAAs are consumed pre workout vs post workout.

 

Having a serving of EAA Max immediately prior to your workout ensures your muscles aren’t at risk of being catabolized during training. Each serving packs over 6g of essential amino acids, including 5g of 2:1:1 branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). Best of all, EAA Max tastes phenomenal and mixes easily with whatever pre workout you’re using.

 

Speaking of pre workouts…

 

Mega Pre

 

Making gains and building must fast is about pushing your body farther and harder than you previously have. That involves making the most of each and every training session. To take you performance to the next level and ensure each workout is a PR-breaking one, Primeval Labs created Mega Pre.

 

Using a mix of nitric oxide boosters, vasodilators, and energy-enhancers, Mega Pre contains everything you need to push the envelope and build muscle fast.

 

Intracell 7

 

While research has shown that the anabolic window last far longer than we previously thought (especially if you’re taking your EAA Max pre workout), there’s still an opportunity to take advantage of the heightened insulin sensitivity and glycogen supercompensation.

 

Intracell 7 provides an ideal mix of fast-digesting carbohydrates and essential amino acids needed to raise insulin levels, stopping catabolism and promoting glycogen replenishment and muscle recovery and growth.

 

Used together, Primeval Labs has created the ultimate stack to help you build muscle fast, but it all begins with you making the commitment to consistently train hard, eat enough protein, and rest properly.

 

Once you’ve got the basics nailed, you’ll be amazed how using the right supplements at the right time can help you build muscle fast and get the body you’ve always wanted!

 

References

 

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  2. Zhang J, Hupfeld CJ, Taylor SS, Olefsky JM, Tsien RY. Insulin disrupts β-adrenergic signalling to protein kinase A in adipocytes. Nature. 2005;437:569. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature04140.

  3. Wang X, Hu Z, Hu J, Du J, Mitch WE. Insulin resistance accelerates muscle protein degradation: Activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by defects in muscle cell signaling. Endocrinology. 2006;147(9):4160-4168. doi:10.1210/en.2006-0251

  4. Aragon AA, Schoenfeld BJ. Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window? J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2013;10(1):5. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

  5. Bellisle F, McDevitt R, Prentice AM. Meal frequency and energy balance. Br J Nutr. 1997;77 Suppl 1:S57-70.

  6. Moore DR, Areta J, Coffey VG, et al. Daytime pattern of post-exercise protein intake affects whole-body protein turnover in resistance-trained males. Nutrition & Metabolism. 2012;9:91. doi:10.1186/1743-7075-9-91.

  7. Mesarwi O, Polak J, Jun J, Polotsky VY. Sleep disorders and the development of insulin resistance and obesity. Endocrinology and metabolism clinics of North America. 2013;42(3):617-634. doi:10.1016/j.ecl.2013.05.001.

  8. Ibañez J, Izquierdo M, Argüelles I, et al. Twice-Weekly Progressive Resistance Training Decreases Abdominal Fat and Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Older Men With Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2005;28(3):662 LP-667. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/28/3/662.abstract.

  9. Eric T. Poehlman, Roman V. Dvorak, Walter F. DeNino, Martin Brochu, Philip A. Ades; Effects of Resistance Training and Endurance Training on Insulin Sensitivity in Nonobese, Young Women: A Controlled Randomized Trial, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 85, Issue 7, 1 July 2000, Pages 2463–2468, https://doi.org/10.1210/jcem.85.7.6692

  10. Little JP, Gillen JB, Percival ME, Safdar A, Tarnopolsky MA, Punthakee Z, Jung ME, Gibala MJ. Low-volume high-intensity interval training reduces hyperglycemia and increases muscle mitochondrial capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. J Appl Physiol. 2011 Dec;111(6):1554-60.

  11. Denne SC, Liechty EA, Liu YM, Brechtel G, Baron AD: Proteolysis in skeletal muscle and whole body in response to euglycemic hyperinsulinemia in normal adults. Am J Physiol. 1991, 261 (6 Pt 1): E809-14.

  12. Gelfand RA, Barrett EJ: Effect of physiologic hyperinsulinemia on skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown in man. J Clin Invest. 1987, 80 (1): 1-6. 10.1172/JCI113033

  13. Heslin MJ, Newman E, Wolf RF, Pisters PW, Brennan MF: Effect of hyperinsulinemia on whole body and skeletal muscle leucine carbon kinetics in humans. Am J Physiol. 1992, 262 (6 Pt 1): E911-8.

  14. Ivy JL: Glycogen resynthesis after exercise: effect of carbohydrate intake. Int J Sports Med. 1998, 19 (Suppl 2): S142-5.

  15. Zawadzki KM, Yaspelkis BB, Ivy JL: Carbohydrate-protein complex increases the rate of muscle glycogen storage after exercise. J Appl Physiol. 1992, 72 (5): 1854-9.

  16. Tipton KD, Rasmussen BB, Miller SL, Wolf SE, Owens-Stovall SK, Petrini BE, Wolfe RR: Timing of amino acid-carbohydrate ingestion alters anabolic response of muscle to resistance exercise. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2001, 281 (2): E197-206.

  17. Schoenfeld B, Ogborn D, Krieger J. Dose-Response Relationship between Weekly Resistance Training Volume and Increases in Muscle Mass: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.; 2016. doi:10.1080/02640414.2016.1210197.

  18. Schoenfeld BJ, Ratamess NA, Peterson MD, Contreras B, Tiryaki-Sonmez G. Influence of Resistance Training Frequency on Muscular Adaptations in Well-Trained Men. J strength Cond Res. 2015;29(7):1821-1829. doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000000970.

  19. Schoenfeld BJ, Ogborn D, Krieger JW. Effects of Resistance Training Frequency on Measures of Muscle Hypertrophy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Sport Med. 2016;46(11):1689-1697. doi:10.1007/s40279-016-0543-8.

  20. Schoenfeld B, Pope Z, M. Benik F, et al. Longer Inter-Set Rest Periods Enhance Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Resistance-Trained Men. Vol 30.; 2015. doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000001272.