High Volume Big Pumps Workout

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When it comes to working out, two things are indisputable:

 

  • Everyone wants to build muscle

  • Everyone loves a sick muscle pump

 

Show us a person who doesn’t enjoy building massive muscle or pumps, and we’ll show them the way to the nearest psych ward.

 

Simply put, the pump is awesome, not only for the nice boost in confidence it gives, or the improved aesthetics, but because it also helps you build muscle too!

 

To help you get a raging pump during your workout, and make those epic gains in size and strength that we all want from our training, we’ve put together the perfect high volume, big pumps workout that all but guarantees bigger, stronger muscles and pumps that’ll make your muscles ache!

 

Fair warning, this is no two pump chump workout. This is the pump workout to end ALL pump workouts….your muscles have been warned!

 

What Causes the Pump?

 

Understanding how you get a raging muscle pump during your workout necessitates a discussion of some exercise physiology. (Don’t worry, we’re not going to bore you to death!)

 

Each repetition of your workout involves two phases -- the concentric phase (raising the weight) and the eccentric phase (lowering the weight). The “top” of the concentric phase is when you’ve fully contracted the working muscle and the “bottom” of the eccentric phase is when the muscle is relaxed.

 

Now, during the concentric portion of the lift, your muscle fibers expand, and when that happens, blood flow to the muscle is reduced (or “pinched” off) due to the expanding muscle fibers. When you’ve completed the rep and are at the bottom of the rep, immediately before you start the next rep, your muscle fibers are relaxed, which allows blood to easily pass between them.

 

This back and forth transfer of blood being pumped to and from the muscles is what ultimately leads to a muscle pump. Essentially, when blood is being pumped into your muscles faster than it can leave, the blood starts to “pool” (accumulate) in your muscles, resulting in a very soul-satisfying muscle pump.

 

So, the more contractions you can perform in a certain time period, the more blood accumulates, and with it more swelling of the muscle, and we have the kind of pump that would make Arnold jealous!

 

How to Get a Muscle Pump?

 

Training specifically for the pump isn’t all that difficult, but it can be very taxing, as much (possibly more so) than pure strength training. This is because pump workouts require high reps and reduced rest periods.

 

More specifically:

 

  1. Performing a higher number of reps per set, forces your muscles to generate the “pump compounds” faster than your body can transfer away.

  2. Using shorter rest periods than normal also increases the metabolic stress on your body (which leads to muscle growth) and also reduces the time your body has to clear metabolic waste products, making it easier to keep the pump rolling all workout long!

 

Since high reps (volume) and short rest periods are needed for pump workouts, that means you want to avoid two things at all costs when training for the pump:

 

  • Long rest periods (>90 seconds)

  • Low reps (<10 reps / set)

 

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If you’re not interested in getting a muscle pump (is that even possible?!), then by all means, stick to your powerlifting program, but if you do want to train for a sick muscle pump, it’s time to increase volume and decrease time between sets.

 

When performing pump workouts, it’s not uncommon to perform 12-15+ reps per set, sometimes going as high as 25-30 reps! Rest is also considerable less. There’s no 2, 3, or heaven-forbid 5 minute rest periods here. To train properly for the pump in your workout, limit your rest periods to around 30 to 90 seconds of rest between each set.

 

Using this tried and true combination of high reps and brief rest periods causes a large increase in blood flow, while simultaneously making it harder for blood to leave the area, yielding a pump that keeps on giving all workout long!

 

Build Muscle with Big Pumps

Pump workouts are often poopoo-ed as “easy” or for superficial purposes. Powerlifting proponents will say pump training doesn’t build muscle, but that’s not actually true.

 

The body will build muscle as a result of one of three factors[1]:

 

  1. Increased tension -- constantly subjecting your muscles to greater levels of tension over time, this is also known as progressive overload

  2. Muscle damage -- changes that happen to the muscle (stretching, tearing, etc) as a result of training, which forces them to recover, rebuild, and grow stronger for the next workout

  3. Metabolic Stress -- exercise exhausts muscle fibers, depleting them of ATP, which causes a buildup of metabolic waste products that forces an “additive hypertrophic effect” in the body

 

Traditional strength training (low reps/volume, heavy weight) typically relies on the first and second mechanisms while pump training can really utilize all three methods, potentially delivering more muscle gain.

 

Pump workouts also increase “cellular swelling”, which ramps up protein synthesis and reduces protein breakdown, which leads to more muscle growth over time.[2] And they’re great for adding extra volume for those troublesome, slow-responding muscle groups.

 

Now let’s get to the workout!

 

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5 Day High Volume, Big Pumps Workout



Monday - Chest

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Barbell Bench Press

3

10-12

90 sec

     

Incline Dumbbell Press (superset with decline push ups)

3

12-15

0 sec

     

Decline Push Ups

3

AMRAP

90 sec

     

Hammer Strength Chest Press*

3

10+10

60 sec

     

Cable Crossover

3

15-20

45 sec

     

Pec Dec**

1

100 Reps

00 sec

   

*

*Note: Perform 10 reps then immediately cut the weight by 20-30% and perform another 10 reps

**Note: Select a weight you can perform for 20 reps and use rest-pause training to knock out 100 reps.



Tuesday - Back

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Pull ups

3

10-12

90 sec

     

Seated Cable Row (superset with straight arm pulldown)

3

12-15

0 sec

     

Straight Arm Pulldown

3

15 reps

90 sec

     

1 Arm Dumbbell Row*

3

10+10

60 sec

     

Dumbbell Pullover

3

15-20

45 sec

     

Lat Pulldown**

1

100 Reps

00 sec

     

*Note: Perform 10 reps then immediately cut the weight by 20-30% and perform another 10 reps

**Note: Select a weight you can perform for 20 reps and use rest-pause training to knock out 100 reps.

 

Wednesday - Legs

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Barbell Back Squat

3

10

90 sec

     

Romanian Deadlifts (superset with goblet squats)

3

10-12

0 sec

     

Goblet Squats

3

12-15

90 sec

     

Leg Press*

3

10 + 10

60 sec

     

Leg Curls

3

15-20

45-60 sec

     

Seated Calf Raise

3

Max Reps

0 sec

     

*Note: Perform 10 reps then immediately cut the weight by 20-30% and perform another 10 reps

**Note: Select a weight you can perform for 20 reps and use rest-pause training to knock out 100 reps.



Thursday - Shoulders

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Lateral Raises (superset with Arnold Press)

3

12

0 sec

     

Seated Arnold Press

3

10-12

90 sec

     

EZ Bar Upright Row

3

12-15

60 sec

     

Hammer Strength Shoulder Press*

3

10 + 10

60 sec

     

Face pulls

3

15-20

45-60 sec

     

Reverse Pec Dec**

3

100

0 sec

     

*Note: Perform 10 reps then immediately cut the weight by 20-30% and perform another 10 reps

**Note: Select a weight you can perform for 20 reps and use rest-pause training to knock out 100 reps.

 

Friday - Arms

Exercise

Sets

Reps

Rest

     

Close Grip Bench Press (superset with barbell curl)

3

10

0 sec

     

Barbell Curl

3

10

90 sec

     

Cable Rope Pushdown*

3

10 + 10

60 sec

     

Cable Rope Curl*

3

10 + 10

60 sec

     

Dumbbell Kickbacks (superset with incline dumbbell curls)

3

15-20

0 sec

     

Incline Dumbbell Curls

3

15-20

60 sec

     

Tricep Push Ups

1

AMRAP

3 min

     

Dumbbell Curl w/ Twist*

1

100

60 sec

     

*Note: Perform 10 reps then immediately cut the weight by 20-30% and perform another 10 reps

**Note: Select a weight you can perform for 20 reps and use rest-pause training to knock out 100 reps.

 

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Pump Workout Stack

 

Pump training isn’t for the weak of heart. It taxes not only on your muscles, but also your cardiovascular and psychological systems too as you know deep down you have to keep pushing for more and more reps even though your muscles are BURNING!

 

Primeval Labs has developed the ultimate pump workout stack to help you get a raging pump during your workout and keep it for hours afterwards when you use:

 

Pre Workout: Mega Pre + Vasogorge

 

You want to know the best pre workout to choose for you pump workouts?

 

You need look no further than Primeval Labs who has a duo of pre workout that generate massive, dense muscle pumps. Leading the charge for truly effective pre workouts, that also give raging pumps is Mega Pre.

 

Utilizing several blood flow-promoting agents including the full clinical dose of VasoDrive-AP alongside 6g of vasodilating L-Citrulline, Mega Pre is the consummate pump workout training fuel.

 

To up the ante on your pump workouts just a bit more for those “all time” pumps, Primeval Labs has developed the capsule-delivery blood flow optimizer VasoGorge. It can be use on its own or stacked with Mega Pre to give your pumps a sick pump!

 

Intracell 7

 

Pump workouts are unlike any other, and to sustain and overcome the intensity of those epic pump session, you need a righteous intra workout fuel. That’s where Intracell 7 comes in!

 

Intracell 7 uses a performance-boosting blend of fast-digesting carbohydrates, hydration support agents, and a full complement of essential amino acids to power your performance and crank up the volume on your pumps.

 

Consume one scoop pre workout and then sip another serving during your workout to top off your glycogen stores, replenish depleting electrolytes, and carry you over the finish line.




References

 

  1. Schoenfeld, B. J. (2010). The mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy and their application to resistance training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 24(10), 2857–2872. http://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e840f3

  2. Schoenfeld, B., & Contreras, B. (2014). The Muscle Pump: Potential Mechanisms and Applications for Enhancing Hypertrophic Adaptations. Strength and Conditioning Journal (Vol. 36). http://doi.org/10.1097/SSC.0000000000000021