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Neanderthal

$69.99

It used to be that a man knew his place in the world; he could be rugged, ruthless, and even a bit crude, but sadly those days are no more. Blame it on whatever you will, but the fact is the modern man is sad, sorry sack of an excuse of his once masculine self.

 

He’s missing that cunning and aggressive edge that made him the alpha among all the betas aimlessly meandering through life. Well, the time has come for man to get back to his primeval roots, and unleash his inner Neanderthal.

 

What is Neanderthal?

 

Neanderthal is the latest ground-breaking supplement from Primeval Labs that will increase your natural testosterone levels, enhance your libido, and restore your confidence. This collection of all natural ingredient have been precisely formulated to increase testosterone production while reducing any unwanted estrogen conversion in the body.

 

Why Use a Test Booster?

 

Men’s testosterone levels peak at age 30, and then it’s a steady decline into the gloomy realm of low testosterone, and with that comes decreased energy, libido, mood, and muscle mass. But, your fate doesn’t have to be one of doom and gloom.

 

Neanderthal has been scientifically formulated to restore your testosterone production and make you feel like the like strong, virulent alpha male you used to be. While using Neanderthal, you’ll experience increased metabolism, superior lean mass gains, improved libido, and significantly greater energy levels. All of this can be accomplished by tapping into the synergism of 11 proven ingredients that will stimulate the production of testosterone and bring out the Neanderthal inside of you!

Neanderthal Benefits

Boosts testosterone

 

Enhances libido

 

Greater stamina

 

Increases vitality

 

Improves recovery

 

Enhances lean mass gains

 

Reduces body fat

 

Elevates mood

 

Bolsters sexual performance

 

Skyrockets energy levels

 

Inhibits aromatase



Neanderthal Ingredients

Vitamin D3 (5,000IU)

While we live in one of the most technologically advanced periods in human history, the unfortunate by-product of our technological superiority is a severe lack of outdoor time. This might not seem like a problem, until you realize the more you avoid the sun, the more likely you are to develop an alarming deficiency in Vitamin D.

This essential fat-soluble vitamin, more commonly known as the “sunshine” vitamin, is critical to proper hormone production in the body, namely testosterone. Low Vitamin D levels are linked to reduced free testosterone, and increased estrogen levels and body fat.[1] On top of that, a deficiency of Vitamin D has also been linked to lower fertility, reduced lean mass, increased depression, and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Neanderthal includes a robust 5,000IU Vitamin D per serving. Supplementation with Vitamin D levels has been found to increase testosterone levels by as much as 20%![2] Plus, Vitamin D also aids inhibition of aromatase, providing another means for increasing testosterone production.[3]

 

Zinc (30mg)

Research has established a well-defined link between zinc, testosterone, and sexual health, sadly many individuals are deficient in this essential mineral, especially those engaged in intense training. This sets you up not only for reduced testosterone production, but also exposes you to poor immune function and overall health, due to the numerous roles zinc plays in the body.[4] Plus, being deficient in zinc is also associated with decreased libido -- something no man wants!

Zinc is also important if you’re looking to maximize muscle gains as well since it’s been shown to enhance IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1), a hormone essential for recovery and growth.[5]  The point of all of this is that while other ingredient may receive a lot of the spotlight when talking about boosting testosterone, it’s the little guys like zinc, that can play a major role in whether you’re a stud or a dud in the bedroom.

 

D-Aspartic Acid (3g)

D-Aspartic Acid (DAA) is a non-essential amino acid that plays a vital role in the neuroendocrine system, particularly in regards to the production of male sex hormones. DAA causes a release of several crucial hormones involved in the testosterone production process including luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and growth hormone. Increased production of these essential hormones leads to significantly enhanced testosterone production. Research has should that subjects given 3g per day of DAA (the same dose included in Neanderthal) for 12 days experienced a 42% increase in testosterone production![6]

 

Maca Powder (3g)

Long used by the natives of Peru as an aphrodisiac, Maca is a plant frequently supplemented for its testosterone-boosting, stress-relieving benefits. Several scientific studies have shown maca to be incredibly successful for increasing libido, sexual desire, and even fertility.[7,8]

On top of that, maca is also a potent adaptogen, which will help to combat stress and may yield some benefits in regards to increased performance, learning, and memory.[9] Some animal research even notes that it can decrease prostate size.

Taken altogether, you can see why Maca is such a staple among Peruvians, and now you get to experience its benefits first hand, and in a massive 3g dose!

 

L-Carnitine L-Tartrate (2g)

Carnitine is a substance used by the body for converting fat into useable energy. Unfortunately, regular L-Carnitine isn’t all that effective unless you’re deficient in the the compound (i.e. vegetarians and the elderly). However, L-Carnitine L-Tartrate (LCLT) is an incredibly bioavailable source of L-Carnitine that’s been shown to be effective for a wide range of people, including high level athletes.

Aside from enhancing your natural fat burning abilities, LCLT is also an incredibly powerful muscle-building and recovery supplement. Supplementation with 1-2g LCLT has been shown to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage and increase androgen receptor density.[10,11] What this means is that LCLT helps your body use your hormones (like testosterone) more efficiently making for better recovery and testosterone production. As a bonus perk, carnitine supplementation can also enhance sperm motility.[12]

 

Rhodiola Rosea (300mg)

Many know cortisol has the stress hormone. When you get stressed, you have trouble sleeping, feel hungrier, and generally are more on edge. While all this sounds pretty unsettling, what’s worse is that when you're chronically stressed, your testosterone production is also negatively impacted. That’s where Rhodiola Rosea comes in.

Rhodiola is one of the most popular adaptogenic herbs that helps the body handle all the various physical, emotional, and psychological stressors that bombard you on a daily basis. Adaptogens improve our response to stress, helping keep cortisol low, and improve alertness by reducing mental fatigue.[13] As an added bonus, rhodiola even boosts cognitive function and memory via its actions on the various neurotransmitter systems of the brain, including dopamine, serotonin, and  norepinephrine.[14]

 

Sensoril Ashwagandha (125mg)

 

Ashwagandha is another popular adaptogenic herb widely used in Ayurveda. In addition to its ability to ameliorate stress[15], ashwagandha also boosts production of several important man-making hormones including Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and Testosterone. This powerful herb is also effective for reducing Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) levels, which improves semen quality in men.[16]
Neanderthal includes the premier form of Ashwagandha in Sensoril, which has is standardized for 8% Withanolides.

 

Mucuna Pruriens (300mg)

 

Mucuna Pruriens is a medicinal plant prized for its high L-Dopa content. L-Dopa is the precursor to dopamine in the body and when supplemented works to increase the body’s natural dopamine production, thereby enhancing mood.[17]
More importantly, L-Dopa inhibits prolactin release from the anterior pituitary, which preserves liver and kidney function.[18] Plus, L-Dopa also boosts libido and it even has been shown to increase testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, while also reducing cortisol.[19,20] Basically, mucuna pruriens optimizes your body’s hormonal environment for maximum performance in the gym and in the bedroom!

 

DIM (100mg)
Short for Diindolylmethane, DIM is the primary active compound contained in indole-3-carbinol (I3C). Indole-3-Carbinol is found in several varieties of cruciferous vegetables shown to block estrogen and inhibit aromatase activity. Essentially, DIM is a more direct, active form of I3C that delivers the same benefits in a more efficient manner.

 

DIM works in a number of ways, but the end result is all the same -- decreased “bad” estrogen levels, and more of the “good” kind, like 2-hydroxyestrone (a “good” estrogen).[21,22,23]

 

Boron (10mg)

 

Similar to zinc, boron is another trace essential mineral that’s necessary for health and optimal function. It’s vital for bone growth, but research has revealed it’s also extremely important for testosterone production. In fact, studies have shown that supplementing with 10mg boron (the same dose here!) significantly increases free testosterone levels 28% and decreases estradiol 39% after only seven days of use![24,25]

 

Boron is also beneficial for bone maintenance, cognition, learning, and many other things[25], which is why you never want to be lacking in this essential mineral.

Dosing

 

For best results, mix 1 rounded scoop with 6oz cold water and consume before bed.

 

References

 

  1. Lee DM, Tajar A, Pye SR, et al. Association of hypogonadism with vitamin D status: the European Male Ageing Study. Eur J Endocrinol. 2012;166(1):77-85. doi:10.1530/EJE-11-0743.

  2. Pilz S, Frisch S, Koertke H, et al. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on testosterone levels in men. Horm Metab Res = Horm und Stoffwechselforsch = Horm  Metab. 2011;43(3):223-225. doi:10.1055/s-0030-1269854.

  3. Dahlquist DT, Dieter BP, Koehle MS. Plausible ergogenic effects of vitamin D on athletic performance and recovery. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2015;12(1):33. doi:10.1186/s12970-015-0093-8.

  4. Kylie, M., et. al. (2006). The effect of exhaustion exercise on thyroid hormones and testosterone of elite athletes receiving oral zinc. Neuro Endocrinology Letters. 27(1-2): 247-252

  5. Rocha ED de M, de Brito NJN, Dantas MMG, Silva A de A, Almeida M das G, Brandao-Neto J. Effect of Zinc Supplementation on GH, IGF1, IGFBP3, OCN, and ALP in Non-Zinc-Deficient Children. J Am Coll Nutr. 2015;34(4):290-299. doi:10.1080/07315724.2014.929511.

  6. Topo, E., Soricelli, A., D'Aniello, A., Ronsini, S., & D'Aniello, G. (2009). The role and molecular mechanism of D-aspartic acid in the release and synthesis of LH and testosterone in humans and rats. Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, 7(120), 1482-1488.

  7. Shin B-C, Lee MS, Yang EJ, Lim H-S, Ernst E. Maca (L. meyenii) for improving sexual function: a systematic review. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2010;10:44. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-10-44.

  8. Gonzales, G. F., Córdova, A., Vega, K., Chung, A., Villena, A., Góñez, C. and Castillo, S. (2002), Effect of Lepidium meyenii (MACA) on sexual desire and its absent relationship with serum testosterone levels in adult healthy men. Andrologia, 34: 367–372. doi:10.1046/j.1439-0272.2002.00519.x

  9. Rubio J, Caldas M, Dávila S, Gasco M, Gonzales GF. Effect of three different cultivars of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on learning and depression in ovariectomized mice. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2006;6:23. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-6-23.

  10. Kraemer WJ, Volek JS, French DN, et al. The effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation on hormonal responses to resistance exercise and recovery. J strength Cond Res. 2003;17(3):455-462.

  11. Kraemer WJ, Spiering BA, Volek JS, et al. Androgenic responses to resistance exercise: effects of feeding and L-carnitine. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006;38(7):1288-1296. doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000227314.85728.35.

  12. Aliabadi E, Soleimani Mehranjani M, Borzoei Z, Talaei-Khozani T, Mirkhani H, Tabesh H. Effects of L-carnitine and L-acetyl-carnitine on testicular sperm motility and chromatin quality. Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine. 2012;10(2):77-82.

  13. Khanum F., et. al.; Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety; “Rhodiola rosea: A versatile Adaptogen;” 2005

  14. Shevtsov VA, et al; Phytomedicine; “A randomized trial of two different doses of Rhodiola rosea extract versus placebo and control of capacity for mental work;” 2003

  15. Bhutani KK, Jadhav AN, Kalia V. Effect of Symplocos racemosa Roxb. on gonadotropin release in immature female rats and ovarian histology. J Ethnopharmacol. 2004;94(1):197-200. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2004.04.022.

  16. Ahmad, V., Abbasi, M., Zubair, M., Fatima, N., Farooq, U. and Choudhary, M. Iqbal. (2004),Phosphodiesterase-Inhibiting Glycosides from Symplocos racemosa. HCA, 87: 67–72. doi: 10.1002/hlca.200490018

  17. Müller, T; “Acute levodopa administration reduces cortisol release in patients with Parkinson’s disease”; J Neural Transm. 2007 Mar;114(3):347-50; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16932991

  18. Boden, G; Influence of levodopa on serum levels of anterior pituitary hormones in man; Neuroendocrinology. 1972;10(5):309-15;

  19. Shukla, Kamla Kant et al.; Mucuna pruriens improves male fertility by its action on the hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal axis; Fertility and Sterility, Volume 92, Issue 6, 1934-1940

  20. Yamada T, et al. Effect of chronic L-dopa administration on serum luteinizing hormone levels in male rats. Toxicology. (1995)

  21. Sanderson JT, Slobbe L, Lansbergen GW, Safe S, van den Berg M. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and diindolylmethanes differentially induce cytochrome P450 1A1, 1B1, and 19 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Toxicol Sci. 2001;61(1):40-48.

  22. Jellinck PH, Forkert PG, Riddick DS, Okey AB, Michnovicz JJ, Bradlow HL. Ah receptor binding properties of indole carbinols and induction of hepatic estradiol hydroxylation. Biochem Pharmacol. 1993;45(5):1129-1136.

  23. Bradlow HL, Telang NT, Sepkovic DW, Osborne MP. 2-hydroxyestrone: the “good” estrogen. J Endocrinol. 1996;150 Suppl:S259-65.

  24. Naggii, M., & Samman, S. (1997). The effect of boron on plasma testosterone and plasma lipids in rats. Nutrition Research, 17(3): 523 – 531.

  25. Naghii, M. et al. (2011). Comparative effects of daily and weekly boron supplementation on plasma steroid hormones and proinflammatory cytokines. Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology, 25(1): 54-58.

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